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Indian Aesthetic Theory: Rasa | Asian Philosophies

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Dr. Karen Bardsley is going to introduce Rasa, the Indian Aesthetic Theory to our group. Please read https://aesthetics-online.org/page/TrivediIndian ...

Дата загрузки:2021-12-01T23:30:35+0000

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Dr. Karen Bardsley is going to introduce Rasa, the Indian Aesthetic Theory to our group. Please read https://aesthetics-online.org/page/TrivediIndian before joining the meetup.

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Dr. Karen Bardsley has a Ph.D. in philosophy from McGill University. She has a variety of philosophical interests in aesthetics, ethics and metaphysics. Although, she is mostly familiar with Anglo-American analytic philosophy, she would very much like to explore other philosophical traditions.

In Indian aesthetics, a rasa (Sanskrit: रस) literally means "juice, essence or taste". It connotes a concept in Indian arts about the aesthetic flavor of any visual, literary or musical work that evokes an emotion or feeling in the reader or audience but cannot be described. It refers to the emotional flavors/essence crafted into the work by the writer and relished by a 'sensitive spectator' or sahṛdaya, literally one who "has heart", and can connect to the work with emotion, without dryness.

The rasa theory has a dedicated section in the Sanskrit text Natya Shastra, an ancient scripture from the 1st millennium BCE attributed to Bharata Muni. However, its most complete exposition in drama, songs and other performance arts is found in the works of the Kashmiri Shaivite philosopher Abhinavagupta (c. 1000 CE), demonstrating the persistence of a long-standing aesthetic tradition of ancient India. According to the Rasa theory of the Natya Shastra, entertainment is a desired effect of performance arts but not the primary goal, and the primary goal is to transport the audience into another parallel reality, full of wonder and bliss, where they experience the essence of their own consciousness, and reflect on spiritual and moral questions.
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